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Funding Opportunities

Support Others > Funding Opportunities

Funding Opportunities for Walking Projects

This section provides details of the main funding opportunities available that may support community organisations needing to raise funding to deliver walking activities. 

You’ll find: 

  • Key information about the different funding opportunities. 
  • Top tips on how to complete the different grant applications. 
  • Examples of successful grant awards. 

National Lottery Community Fund, Awards for All

Key information about the fund 

The National Lottery Community Fund’s Awards for All programme offers funding from £300 to £20,000. And can support your project for up to two years. 

You can apply for funding to deliver a new or existing activity or to support your organisation to change and adapt to new and future challenges. 

Projects funded through the programme must do at least one of these things: 

  • Bring people together to build strong relationships in and across communities. 
  • Improve the places and spaces that matter to communities. 
  • Help more people to reach their potential, by supporting them at the earliest possible stage. 
  • Support people, communities and organisations facing more demands and challenges because of the cost-of-living crisis. 

A wide range of not-for-profit organisations can apply for the funding including constituted voluntary or community organisations. 

Applications can be made at any time. 

Click here for more information about the fund.

Outline about what is needed to apply including top tips 

The application form asks three main questions. The funder provides a guide on how to answer the questions. 

Here are some ideas of what to tell them about your project: 

  • What would you like to do? 
  • What difference your project will make? 
  • Who will benefit from it? 
  • How long you expect to run it for? This can be an estimate. 
  • How you’ll make sure people know about it? 
  • How you plan to learn from it and use this learning to shape future projects? 
  • Is it something new, or are you continuing something that has worked well previously? They fund both types. 

You can write between 50 and 300 words for this section. 

They can fund projects that’ll do at least one of these things: 

  • bring people together to build strong relationships in and across communities. 
  • improve the places and spaces that matter to communities. 
  • help more people to reach their potential, by supporting them at the earliest possible stage. 
  • support people, communities and organisations facing more demands and challenges because of the cost-of-living crisis. 

You can write between 50 and 150 words for this section. 

What do they mean by community? 

  • People living in the same area. 
  • People who have similar interests or life experiences but might not live in the same area. 
  • Even though schools can be at the heart of a community – they’ll only fund schools that also benefit the communities around them. 

Tell them how your community came up with the idea for your project.  They want to know how many people you’ve spoken to, and how they’ll be involved in the development and delivery of the project. 

Here are some examples of how you could be involving your community

  • Having regular chats with community members, in person or on social media 
  • Including community members on your board or committee 
  • Regular surveys 
  • Setting up steering groups. 
  • Running open days 

You can write between 50 and 200 words for this section. 

The focus of this fund is on the outcomes listed in the first section. This is a different focus compared to Sport England’s Small Grants. Think carefully about which fund your project aligns to best.

Examples of organisations which have already received funding and what they need it for. 

Sport England’s Movement Fund

Key information about the fund 

Sport England’s Movement Fund seeks to develop opportunities for communities to get more people physically active.  Grants available are between £300 and £15,000. Sport and physical activities funded can run from two months to two years. 

This fund prioritises projects where there’s most need. Projects providing opportunities for groups facing barriers to activity are of particular interest, such as:  

  • people living on low incomes.  
  • disabled people or those with long-term health conditions.
  • older people.
  • people from culturally diverse communities.
  • pregnant women and parents with very young children.
  • girls aged 5-16.
  • LGBTQ+ people.
  • people who are in foster care.
  • people who provide care without pay.

They are also particularly interested in projects that address these combined hurdles, such as people with long-term health conditions alongside caring responsibilities – to help assess this they have developed an inequalities metric. 

They also give priority to projects in communities where there is a greater need.  To help with this, they use Place Need Classification (PNC).

A wide range of not-for-profit organisations can apply.  From small community organisations through to statutory bodies. 

Applications can be made at any time. 

The first place to start with this fund is to check whether your organisation might be eligible to apply.  Click here for Sport England’s eligibility quiz. 

Click here for more information about the fund.

Outline about what is needed to apply including top tips 

The following outlines the main questions in the application form and how to complete them. 

Your short title should be related to your project and provide a glimpse into what is to follow in your application.  Sport England love a concise and informative title. For example, “Walking Into Well Being”. Don’t include the name of your organisation in the title. 

Build on the project title. Include a simple explanation detailing what the activities will be, where and when they will happen and who the target audience is. If there’s space outline what the main costs will be. 

You can write up to 100 words for this section. 

In this section you could talk about how and why the project has been developed. 

You could include: 

  • Inspiration: Where did the project idea come from? Was it driven by the needs of the people you are trying to reach?   
  • The People: What do you know about the people you are trying to reach and the things that are important to them to enable them to become active. Do they have multiple hurdles to address. For example, do they have long-term conditions alongside caring responsibilities? 
  • Challenges: What specific challenges do the people you are trying to reach face when it comes to being active? 
  • Demand: How do you know the people you are trying to reach are interested in participating? 
  • Overcoming Barriers: Why do you believe this specific project will address the barriers they face to being active? Have you conducted any pilot tests to validate this? 
  • Existing Work: Does your organisation already offer programmes for the people you are trying to reach? If so, how will this project build on those existing efforts? 
  • Where: Have you used the “Place Need Classification” to identify the need in the area the project will take place?  Click here. 
  • Your Expertise: How has your experience working with this group informed the development of this project? 
  • Similar Opportunities: Are there any existing programmes in your area that offer similar activities? How does your project compare and what unique value will it provide?  Are your working with others in your area? 

You can write up to 500 words for this section. 

Sport England asks you to imagine the end of your project and to briefly describe the positive changes you hope to achieve. What kind of impact will your project have on the people you’re helping? 

You could include: 

  • Short- and long-term goals and the wider benefits: What positive changes will participants experience shortly after the project and further into the future. What positive changes will your organisation see in the short term and long term?  

Examples of the positive changes could include: 

  • Will inactive or less active people become more active during the project and beyond? 
  • Will the people involved feel more connected to their community?  
  • Will the project help to bring people together to be physically active? 
  • Will the project improve people’s physical and mental health? 
  • Will the project help to build/ strengthen social relationships/ friendships? 
  • Will the project help to reduce inequalities? 
  • Are there any environmental benefits? 
  • Will the project have a positive impact on your organisation? E.g. increased membership, increased income, more connected to the local community, more connected with other community organisations and increased sustainability of your organisation. 

Try to make these goals measurable.   

Measuring success: How will you know it’s working? For example, provide an estimate of how many people you hope to become involved in the project. Important, include details of how you have estimated your figures. 

At the end of your project, how might the people involved continue to be physically active in their lives? 

Overcoming obstacles: What challenges will your project address? For example, lack of transportation, access to facilities. 

Equipment & facilities: If your project is focused on upgrading equipment or facilities, explain how this will increase opportunities for getting active. 

Are there any other benefits you think your project can achieve? 

You can write up to 500 words for this section. 

The best way to approach this question is to prepare a simple project plan. You could use a template such as this one: click here.

This will help you think about all the steps you need to take to deliver the project. It will help you think about all the costs that you will need to cover.   

You can upload the plan with your application form. This will help the assessor see that you have thought about the different aspects of the project. It will give them confidence that the project is well planned. 

Use the information to help you populate this and other sections of this application form.  For this section, talk about the: 

  • Location. Where will the activity take place?  Will it be at your own facility or at a hired venue.   
  • Who will deliver the project? Share their qualifications for coaching or any other aspect of your project. Are they part of your team, or will you recruit new staff? 
  • When will the project take place (days, times, frequency)? How do you know this timing works for participants? 
  • What have you done already? Briefly outline the work already done to get to this point. 
  • Facility improvements: If your project involves improvements to facilities, do you need planning permission or consent from the landowner? 

You could also explain why any non-direct delivery costs are required to make the project happen.  These could include marketing cost, management, and administration costs to help you to organise the activities such as hiring coaches and booking venues. 

You can write up to 500 words for this section. 

It is good to tell Sport England more about the project costs and how they have been calculated. This could be done as part of the project plan detailed in the section above. However, back up that information by completing this section.   

Breakdown of Costs: For example, hourly facility rental rates, number of equipment sets needed, or how you determined how many coaches are needed. 
 
Facility Improvements: If you’re improving or altering a facility, let Sport England know who gave you the estimated costs for the work. 
 
Funding Secured: If you’ve already raised funds, please tell Sport England how much and where it’s coming from. 

This section also gives you the opportunity to tell Sport England about any further support they might be able to provide, such as advice or further guidance on the delivery of your project. 

You can write up to 500 words for this section.   

Examples of organisations which have already received funding and what they need it for. 

Other Funders – Derbyshire

Foundation Derbyshire 

Foundation Derbyshire currently manage over 60 individually named funds on behalf of local philanthropists. Each Fund has its own story and criteria that reflect the donors’ range of charitable aims and interests.  Some of these funds will support walking projects.   

Grant awards tend to be up to £2,500. 

The best way to approach Foundation Derbyshire is to phone them first. Telephone 01773 525860. 

Click here for more information about the fund.

Examples of walking related projects which received grants through this fund.

Derbyshire County Council’s Community Leadership Scheme 

Derbyshire County Council operate a scheme to provide small grants to community, voluntary, youth and other local organisations. It’s aim is to support worthwhile projects and initiatives that will benefit local communities. The scheme is designed to meet one-off costs. 

Each of the 64 County Councillors (N.B. not Derby City Councillors) are allocated an annual fund of £7,720 which can be used to support projects in their division.  This allocation is reviewed each financial year; therefore it is not guaranteed that this funding will be reopened in 2024/25.  

Organisations seeking support under the scheme should contact their local county councillor explaining the nature of the project, the amount sought, what other funding may be available, and how it will benefit the community.  

It is for the local county councillor to recommend which projects should be supported under the scheme. 

Click here for more information about the fund.